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Posted by on Sep 10, 2010 in DIY |

How To Make A Perfect Cuppa

Even though the official start to fall isn’t here yet, Mother Nature is whispering her intentions.  The weather is getting cooler and the days shorter and I think I can make out the faint scraping of snow plows against the blacktop. 

Since the hot tea season is upon us, I thought it would be a good time to discuss the proper ways to brew tea.  Really, it is quite simple.  If you keep in mind that the less oxidized the tea the lower the temperature, you’ll be fine.  For more details, continue reading.

White Tea is the least processed/oxidized tea.  The best temperature to brew it at is 170-180 degrees.  If you are making water in a kettle on the stove, pull it as soon as you start to hear it make noise. 

Green Tea is the second least processed/oxidized tea.  The best temperature to brew it at is 180-190 degrees.  If you are making water in a kettle on the stove, pull it as soon as you start to see steam escape.

Oolong Tea has a range of oxidation from 15% to 70%.  This means the lower the percentage the less oxidized it is and the cooler the brewing temperature should be.  However I’ve learned, even lower percentage Oolongs can handle heat.  Meaning if you accidentially boil the water, let it sit for a minute or two and then use it. 

Black Tea, Chai Tea, Mate and other Herbals can handle boiling temperatures, so let that little tea kettle whistle at you. 

If by chance you are busy, as I often am, and leave the kettle on the stove until it whistles but you need cooler temperatures, open the spout and let the steam out for a few minutes.  Then pour it over the tea. 

If you do not have the time to wait for boiling water, pour hot water over your tea and leave it steep longer, as in 20 minutes or longer.  The taste will be milder, but you can still achieve a good flavor of your tea. 

I hope this post can help you make that perfect cuppa!

Bee Well.  Drink Tupelo Honey Teas.

The Tea Lady